By: Thomas Cook

Four Tips For Listing Your Cottage For Rent

Many cottage owners choose to rent out their cottages for a few weeks in the summer – or even year-round. This is a great way to earn extra income when your cottage would ordinarily be sitting unused. But listing your cottage for rent means putting some effort into your listing so you attract the right renters. Use Proper Spelling and Grammar If your listing is full of grammatical errors or spelling mistakes, it might make you appear to be lazy or disorganized. Renters want to know that they are renting from someone who is on top of things and pays attention to detail. Emphasize the Highlights When you’re including as much information as you can, don’t ...Read More

By: Thomas Cook

Are You Considering Selling Your Country Home Or Cottage This Fall?

If you are currently selling a home or are planning on selling your country home or cottage later this year once the summer is over, you know that curb appeal (the first impression the exterior of your home makes) is vital. But in the fall months, it's a constant battle against falling leaves and the impending cold weather. Not to mention, dreary grey skies that can make any negative aspect of your home look that much more prevalent. Here are some tips for improving your curb appeal in the fall months: 1. Keep on top of the leaves. While the leaves are changing colour and look beautiful on the threes, once they're on the ground they can look dirty and like extra clutter. This does...Read More

By: Thomas Cook

Be Careful With "Recently Upgraded" Country Homes And Cottages

"Fully-renovated" and "recently upgraded" are two phrases commonly seen in listings for older cottages and country homes If this is the case, potential buyers should make sure that permits were obtained for whatever upgrades were made to the home or structure before they buy. Building permits are required for installing fireplaces and woodburning stoves, new plumbing, a deck more than two feet above the ground, building garages or balconies as well as the catch-all phrase to "renovate, repair or add to a building". Generally, building something on or around a home as well as changing walls and openings to the home all require a building permit in most munici...Read More

By: Thomas Cook

Closing Down Your Cottage For The Winter Months

There are a lot of ways real estate owners who have country homes or cottages can prepare for winter. While it's not quite winter yet, anyone who's ever swore they'd get around to minor necessary household repairs and maintenance before the snow began to fall has often found themselves in -30 weather in the middle of January wondering why they hadn't gotten around to it sooner. Start early, and recognize that just a bit of preventative maintenance can help lower repair costs, make getting your home ready to sell a quicker process and generally just keep life easier. All of the following winterizing tips can be applied to cottages and other recreational properties as well:...Read More

By: Thomas Cook

Living In A Country Home Or Cottage? A Guide To Finding Your Septic Tank

Most cottage communities and rural properties may have their wastewater treated by a septic tank, or if you want to get fancy, an onsite wastewater system. When buying real estate with a septic tank, you should ask the sellers when the septic tank was pumped last, and whether there have ever been tank or water quality problems. According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, a septic tank needs to be pumped every three to five years or when it is 1/3 full with solid waste, but this timeline may fluctuate depending on frequency of use or the size of your family. Additionally, new septic tanks are made of concrete or fiberglass, but home or property owners with an older septic ta...Read More

By: Thomas Cook

What Buyers And Sellers Need To Know About Country Homes And Cottages With Oil Heating

One thing that many buyers of rural properties and cottages tend to overlook is the possibility their new home will have an oil tank or worse, a hidden underground oil tank. Many Ontario homes use fuel oil when propane and natural gas are not viable options for heating in the area. These homes will normally have an oil tank somewhere on the property, and when preparing to sell your home it's a wise investment to have the tank inspected and to know how old it is. An important distinction is that oil tanks can be either above ground or underground, and each type of fuel oil tank requires a different set of specifications. The average life expectancy of an underground oil tank, for e...Read More